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What happens now

A wide number of agencies and organisations are in the business of providing health and social care services .

Your Family Doctor plays a central part in making sure that you and your family and friends receive the care and support you need. Your GP is the person who can refer you to health care specialists and arrange for admission to an appropriate hospital.

Primary health care groups and trusts provide services through health visitors, district nurses, and therapists.

Social services departments have care managers that look at the care needs. They use rules called eligibility criteria and priorities to decide whether they can arrange services for you and costs involved.

Two Assessments

If you provide substantial and regular unpaid care for someone such as a relative, partner or friend, you may be entitled to a Carer's Assessment, which is separate from the Assessment of Care Needs for the person you care for.

1. Carer's Assessment

When you have an appointment about care services or support, be prepared with an outline of what help or support you think you need as an unpaid carer and how you think your own  needs can be supported.

Suggest ways that any propositions can be adapted to meet both your needs, and the person you care for.

2. Assessment of Care Needs

Long-term care can be provided in any combination of the following:
- in the home of the person needing care,
- day care centres,
- sheltered housing,
- hospitals, and
- residential or nursing homes.

Always listen carefully to what is being offered and the likely costs and outcomes and get any agreements in writing .

Further support can be given by:
- your family, friends, and neighbours,
- voluntary organisations,
- social services and social work departments,
- GP surgeries, district and community nurses, therapists, and
- private sector companies for other services.

 


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